An analysis of the novel the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

Chaucer himself is one of the pilgrims.

An analysis of the novel the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

Recording in reconstructed Middle English pronunciation Problems playing this file? Chaucer wrote in late Middle English, which has clear differences from Modern English. From philological research, we know certain facts about the pronunciation of English during the time of Chaucer. In some cases, vowel letters in Middle English were pronounced very differently from Modern English, because the Great Vowel Shift had not yet happened.

Geoffrey Chaucer | Novelguide

It is obvious, however, that Chaucer borrowed portions, sometimes very large portions, of his stories from earlier stories, and that his work was influenced by the general state of the literary world in which he lived.

Storytelling was the main entertainment in England at the time, and storytelling contests had been around for hundreds of years.

In 14th-century England the English Pui was a group with an appointed leader who would judge the songs of the group. The winner received a crown and, as with the winner of The Canterbury Tales, a free dinner.

It was common for pilgrims on a pilgrimage to have a chosen "master of ceremonies" to guide them and organise the journey. Like the Tales, it features a number of narrators who tell stories along a journey they have undertaken to flee from the Black Death.

It ends with an apology by Boccaccio, much like Chaucer's Retraction to the Tales.

The Canterbury Tales - Wikipedia

A quarter of the tales in The Canterbury Tales parallel a tale in the Decameron, although most of them have closer parallels in other stories. Some scholars thus find it unlikely that Chaucer had a copy of the work on hand, surmising instead that he must have merely read the Decameron at some point, [24] while a new study claims he had a copy of the Decameron and used it extensively as he began work on his own collection.

They include poetry by Ovidthe Bible in one of the many vulgate versions in which it was available at the time the exact one is difficult to determineand the works of Petrarch and Dante. Chaucer was the first author to use the work of these last two, both Italians.

An analysis of the novel the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

Boethius ' Consolation of Philosophy appears in several tales, as the works of John Gower do. Gower was a known friend to Chaucer. A full list is impossible to outline in little space, but Chaucer also, lastly, seems to have borrowed from numerous religious encyclopaedias and liturgical writings, such as John Bromyard 's Summa praedicantiuma preacher's handbook, and Jerome 's Adversus Jovinianum.

Chaucer's Tales differs from most other story "collections" in this genre chiefly in its intense variation. Most story collections focused on a theme, usually a religious one.

Even in the Decameron, storytellers are encouraged to stick to the theme decided on for the day. The idea of a pilgrimage to get such a diverse collection of people together for literary purposes was also unprecedented, though "the association of pilgrims and storytelling was a familiar one".

Geoffrey Chaucer World Literature Analysis

In the General Prologue, Chaucer describes not the tales to be told, but the people who will tell them, making it clear that structure will depend on the characters rather than a general theme or moral.

This idea is reinforced when the Miller interrupts to tell his tale after the Knight has finished his. Having the Knight go first gives one the idea that all will tell their stories by class, with the Monk following the Knight. However, the Miller's interruption makes it clear that this structure will be abandoned in favour of a free and open exchange of stories among all classes present.

Other literary forms

General themes and points of view arise as the characters tell their tales, which are responded to by other characters in their own tales, sometimes after a long lapse in which the theme has not been addressed.

His writing of the story seems focused primarily on the stories being told, and not on the pilgrimage itself. Medieval schools of rhetoric at the time encouraged such diversity, dividing literature as Virgil suggests into high, middle, and low styles as measured by the density of rhetorical forms and vocabulary.

Another popular method of division came from St. Augustinewho focused more on audience response and less on subject matter a Virgilian concern. Augustine divided literature into "majestic persuades", "temperate pleases", and "subdued teaches".

Writers were encouraged to write in a way that kept in mind the speaker, subject, audience, purpose, manner, and occasion. Chaucer moves freely between all of these styles, showing favouritism to none. Thus Chaucer's work far surpasses the ability of any single medieval theory to uncover.

However, even the lowest characters, such as the Miller, show surprising rhetorical ability, although their subject matter is more lowbrow.

Vocabulary also plays an important part, as those of the higher classes refer to a woman as a "lady", while the lower classes use the word "wenche", with no exceptions. At times the same word will mean entirely different things between classes.

The word "pitee", for example, is a noble concept to the upper classes, while in the Merchant's Tale it refers to sexual intercourse.In this article will discuss The Reeve’s Tale Summary in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer.

Two Cambridge students, John and Aleyn, decide to visit the corn ground on the mill at Trumpington, near Cambridge run by Symkym who is dishonest and steal meal and corn. The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories by Geoffrey Chaucer that was first published in Nov 29,  · Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of the Retractions from Geoffrey Chaucer's collection of stories The Canterbury Tales.

In addition to the early allegorical dream visions, the “tragedy” of Troilus and Criseyde, and the“comedy” The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer (CHAW-sur) composed various lyrical poems.

Geoffrey Chaucer died in October 25, In a time when literacy was a luxury affordable only by the very wealthy and powerful, Chaucer¹s writings stand out as .

- The Canterbury Tales The Canterbury Tales, a masterpiece of English Literature, written by Geoffrey Chaucer, is a collection, with frequent dramatic links, of 24 tales told to pass the time during a spring pilgrimage to the shrine of St.

Thomas a Becket in Canterbury.

Geoffrey Chaucer World Literature Analysis - Essay - r-bridal.com