An analysis of to his coy mistress by andrew marvell

It focuses on the lustful desires of a man attempting to entice a female virgin, the mistress, into sexual intimacy. The poem is a tour de force, and has come to be known as a seduction poem or carpe diem seize or pluck the day poem. Wit, allusion and metaphor are all employed in what is a syllogism - a logical argument - that can be summed up in a short phrase: It was first published inin Miscellaneous Poems, three years after the death of the author.

An analysis of to his coy mistress by andrew marvell

I would Love you ten years before the flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews.

Andrew Marvell and To His Coy Mistress

My vegetable love would grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart.

For, lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found; Nor, in thy marble vaults, shall sound My echoing song; then worms shall try That long-preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapped power.

Let us roll all our strength, and all Our sweetness, up into one ball, And tear our pleasure with rough strife Through the iron gates of life: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

An analysis of to his coy mistress by andrew marvell

They could take their time with everything if they had all the time in the world, deciding at leisure how to spend each day.

They could even spend much time on different continents: Marvell in Hull, England, complaining about his absent love as he sits by the River Humber, and his mistress in India by the Ganges, finding rubies.

At a Glance

We cannot make time stand still for us, Marvell concludes, but we will make time fly by enjoying ourselves and making the most of life. Critics have tended to interpret this as a reference to the slow, organic growth of vegetables in the ground: The mistress, we already know, is a virgin: The difference is that Shakespeare wants the Youth to go to bed with someone else, whereas Andrew Marvell wants his mistress to yield to him.In the poem 'To His Coy Mistress' the speaker carefully tells a subtle and valid argument as to why the woman or his addressee should be sexually attracted to him.

The man attempts this sexual proposition through flair in manipulating reason, form and imagery like the vegetable garden. Andrew Marvell conducts many memorable experiments in persona. Persona is the mask, personality, or character created by an author or actor, similar to the narrator or narrators in a novel.

In "Ber. By Andrew Marvell About this Poet Andrew Marvell is surely the single most compelling embodiment of the change that came over English society and letters in the course of the 17th century. "To His Coy Mistress" is divided into three stanzas or poetic paragraphs.

It’s spoken by a nameless man, who doesn’t reveal any physical or biographical details about himself, to a nameless woman, who is also biography-less.

During the first stanza, the speaker tells the mistress that if they. To His Coy Mistress is Andrew Marvell's best known poem. It focuses on the lustful desires of a man attempting to entice a female virgin, the mistress, into sexual intimacy.

Analysis of Andrew Marvell's poem "To His Coy Mistress". | PostPoems

The poem is a tour de force, and has come to be known as a seduction poem or carpe diem (seize or pluck the day) poem. Wit.

An analysis of to his coy mistress by andrew marvell

To His Coy Mistress: This poem is spoken by a male lover to his female beloved as an attempt to convince her to make love to him. The speaker argues that the Lady’s shyness and hesitancy would be acceptable if the two had “world enough, and time.”.

A Short Analysis of Andrew Marvell’s ‘To His Coy Mistress’ | Interesting Literature